How to Learn to Sing (Better)

One of the greatest joys in my life is to teach gifted singers on a regular basis (in my studio at Westminster Choir College of Rider University), several other wonderful artists periodically, and quite a few students in various master classes. Regardless of the frequency of these encounters, whatever learning and growth take place is dependent on what both teacher and student do.

To a very large degree, the effectiveness of a voice teacher is due to how well he/she motivates students. A good teacher is never too easily satisfied, and the focus of a lesson is seldom limited to resonance and support (though vitally important). One teaches artistry, musicianship, organized thinking, discipline…and responsibility. Various teachers have varying styles to help students work well and accomplish much; my own manner is to be respectful and considerate of the student, to be authoritative (after all, I do believe in what I teach!), but seldom to demand.

Having said the above, the one thing that is uniquely the responsibility of the voice teacher is to guide a student in the formation of his/her vocal technique. This is not the privilege or the job of the choral conductor or vocal coach, I hasten to add. In actuality, each singer must be the chair of his/her “vocal board” and the voice teacher is “senior advisor” and guide. Many students fail to assume their own privilege, due to the time and energy they spend with conductors and coaches, who give them specific input into musical performance. It is too easy for these students to mindlessly do as they are told—certainly not the intention of my colleagues.

As magical as vocalization in the studio may seem to be (it is thrilling for me to see eyes light up with new successes in vocalization!), and as enlightening as repertoire and text work may be, the real engine that determines a student’s progress is the student him/herself. Not only does a good teacher bring new instruction, information and advice to the student in a lesson, that teacher must affirm what the student discovers in practice and performance. Sometimes, that affirmation is quickly followed by introduction of alternative techniques that will be more beneficial in the long run. This kind of teaching moment does not happen unless the student has been working diligently and consistently.

Westminster (where I have been privileged to teach for quite a few years) boasts a large and highly-capable voice faculty. I have excellent colleagues; we share many basic values, preferences and techniques that characterize our teaching.

I am convinced that the determining factor of a student’s success is usually less about technical approach, and more about how that student responds and works between lessons—what he/she brings into the teaching studio. Even with benign or inappropriate technical emphases from voice teachers, smart and gifted students will largely find a way to “put things together.” I certainly enjoy teaching more when students come to their lessons with an agenda, questions and suggestions—balanced by their trust and willingness to accept my instruction. We all benefit.

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4 thoughts on “How to Learn to Sing (Better)

  1. I agree with everything you say- and I would emphasize in particular the importance that students work between lessons. After all, it is one thing to understand, but quite another to DO, and in order for a student to replace a bad habit with a better one it is simply imperative that practice- which leads to muscle memory- be regular and thoughtful.

    I like, also, your calling the student the “board” and the teacher the “advisor,” which places the onus ultimately on the student. Far too many students, especially beginners, are all too eager to do whatever their teachers tell them. That they are the learners of something not so easily seen or understood makes a lot of them particularly amenable and pliable, so it is incumbent upon teachers to make it clear that questions are never discouraged since each student is ultimately responsible for his own instrument.

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