Kavbar’s Blog

I have been taught that vocalization is best done in short sessions of 10-12 minutes (Garcia even recommended only 5-minute sessions), and I pass this along to my students. We should vocalize for 3-4 sessions a day when building technique. This article from the New York Times seems to back up that strategy. Take a look: http://well.blogs.nytimes.com/2013/07/05/ask-well-3-short-workouts-or-1-long-one/?smid=pl-share

”Look,” he says quietly, slowly, ”at a certain point, something is musical. And beneath that point, it’s not musical. You can’t sing out of tune, you can’t play out of rhythm, you can’t play your instrument that isn’t tuned, the tempo has to be right. I don’t know, is that perfection? I don’t say that once you reach that point, you must keep going to the sky — although I do think, Hey, you got this far, why don’t you see how far you can go? If you want to call that perfection, O.K. But it’s not anywhere near perfection, it’s just musical.”  Paul Simon

Hello, dear students (and honored guests). You notice that I have not written a post here in a long time, but today I am inspired to give some guidance. Since you are here now, I urge you to look around after you read this post, as there are others that you will find helpful.

Many of you face voice juries, recitals, auditions, or other imminent performances. In the days leading up to such opportunities, here are a few not-quite-random thoughts to consider.

1. Worry or extreme anxiety may be a clue that you are not well-prepared. Yet, it is never too late to increase your chances for a stronger performance, although it is surely true that inadequate preparation does not allow your very best work.

2. With humans (that would include most of us!), the mindset of “all or nothing” is generally not a helpful approach to performance. You will never achieve the dream, “ultimate” level that you strive for, but you must move towards it. If you are ever convinced you’ve hit a perfect 10 on your personal scale, then re-calibrate that 10 to 8 or 9, and keep progressing. Don’t worry, this will happen very rarely (or never) if you are honest. As with good body management, we are not after place or position, but direction.

3. Obsession with perfection is an inhibiting, negative, destructive, damaging, limiting, damnable energy-drain for performers.

4. Obsession with perfection is an inhibiting, negative, destructive, damaging, limiting, damnable energy-drain for performers.

5. Obsession with perfection is an inhibiting, negative, destructive, damaging, limiting, damnable energy-drain for performers. It is never a good thing. Don’t try to be perfect; be truthful, open, communicative, skilled, confident and grateful for the opportunity to perform.

6. Here is a short list of some fundamentals in vocal technique:

a. balanced, deep, and accessible breath support (appoggio),

b. easy availability of energy to articulate tone and language, avoiding “support” from the upper body,

c. freedom to inspire physical processes with mental/emotional “performer energy,”

d. Etc. [Add your favorite fundamental here.]

7. As the word implies, a “fundamental” rests securely deep within you, at your core, your foundation. It is not at the top of your thought process, a mental effort to make things happen. Fundamentals allow/empower things to happen, they don’t exist for their own glorification. Every desirable action is allowed or inspired by the imagination, not by “manual override.”

8. Fundamental technique is a result of both learning/understanding and training. It happens over time. One of my wisest teachers told me that a talented singer should be able to learn and embody a solid vocal technique in two years of study. I think she was right, given consistent and dedicated work by that student. Once the essence of technique is incorporated, your continuing study is towards refinement, making specific application and choices, improving your abilities, etc. This work is done with your voice teacher, with trusted coaches, and sometimes independently–above all, through consistent practice.

9. All of the choral/ensemble/non-classical singing that you do is potentially limiting to your own progress. This is why your own personal practice must be sufficient to keep your goals clear. As I have said many times, you must be the Chair of your own Vocal Board, and your voice teacher is your Senior Advisor. No conductor, coach, director, parent or friend, has the right/responsibility to either of those positions (Chair, Senior Advisor).

This is not a comprehensive list of values or processes, but I must at least mention that it is never too late to review texts, translations, dramatic subtext, poetic thought, etc. Musical score study is never inappropriate. It is a good idea to refresh your memory. Additionally, the more you live with a song or aria, the more likely you are to find new connections on the printed page that will enhance your performance. This may relate to musical or textual phrasing, new insights into why the composer made some of his/her choices, etc.

Bottom line, do not panic. Do not give up. Make the time to be as well-prepared as possible, building on what you have already done. Choose to present yourself confidently and give a valid performance that represents your most truthful and committed work on that day. Choose to be on the up-escalator, progressing even through the performance itself.

Do Less and Focus Hard: If You’re Busy, You’re Doing Something Wrong

http://lifehacker.com/5988460/

One of the greatest joys in my life is to teach gifted singers on a regular basis (in my studio at Westminster Choir College of Rider University), several other wonderful artists periodically, and quite a few students in various master classes. Regardless of the frequency of these encounters, whatever learning and growth take place is dependent on what both teacher and student do.

To a very large degree, the effectiveness of a voice teacher is due to how well he/she motivates students. A good teacher is never too easily satisfied, and the focus of a lesson is seldom limited to resonance and support (though vitally important). One teaches artistry, musicianship, organized thinking, discipline…and responsibility. Various teachers have varying styles to help students work well and accomplish much; my own manner is to be respectful and considerate of the student, to be authoritative (after all, I do believe in what I teach!), but seldom to demand.

Having said the above, the one thing that is uniquely the responsibility of the voice teacher is to guide a student in the formation of his/her vocal technique. This is not the privilege or the job of the choral conductor or vocal coach, I hasten to add. In actuality, each singer must be the chair of his/her “vocal board” and the voice teacher is “senior advisor” and guide. Many students fail to assume their own privilege, due to the time and energy they spend with conductors and coaches, who give them specific input into musical performance. It is too easy for these students to mindlessly do as they are told—certainly not the intention of my colleagues.

As magical as vocalization in the studio may seem to be (it is thrilling for me to see eyes light up with new successes in vocalization!), and as enlightening as repertoire and text work may be, the real engine that determines a student’s progress is the student him/herself. Not only does a good teacher bring new instruction, information and advice to the student in a lesson, that teacher must affirm what the student discovers in practice and performance. Sometimes, that affirmation is quickly followed by introduction of alternative techniques that will be more beneficial in the long run. This kind of teaching moment does not happen unless the student has been working diligently and consistently.

Westminster (where I have been privileged to teach for quite a few years) boasts a large and highly-capable voice faculty. I have excellent colleagues; we share many basic values, preferences and techniques that characterize our teaching.

I am convinced that the determining factor of a student’s success is usually less about technical approach, and more about how that student responds and works between lessons—what he/she brings into the teaching studio. Even with benign or inappropriate technical emphases from voice teachers, smart and gifted students will largely find a way to “put things together.” I certainly enjoy teaching more when students come to their lessons with an agenda, questions and suggestions—balanced by their trust and willingness to accept my instruction. We all benefit.

Hearing a loud voice is like being in a small room, with overpoweringly bright lights.

Hearing a big voice is like being in a large room, with many interesting lighting options.

The first of six segments, providing the complete Italienisches Liederbuch of Hugo Wolf, has been uploaded to YouTube. I am joined by my excellent colleagues and friends, soprano Faith Esham and pianist J.J. Penna, in this recent recital at the Schubert Geburtshaus in magical Vienna–the very place where Wolf flourished, along with Mozart, Schubert,  Brahms, Mahler, Strauss and so many other prominent composers. The remaining segments of our recital are also now available.

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